Portugal Tourism Policies and Trends

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Tourism in the economy
According to the Portuguese Tourism Satellite Account (TSA), tourism consumption contributed 10.5% to GDP in 2008 (it represented 10.5% in 2007 and 9.7% in 2006). The TSA estimates that employment in tourism-characteristic industries/activities represented around 8% of total employment in 2007.    
The Cross-Border Movements Survey shows total visitors of some 23.8 million in 2007, 5.4% up on the 22.6million recorded in the previous year (figures include same day visitors). Tourism receipts totalled EUR 7.4 billion in 2008 compared with EUR 6.7 billion in 2006.    

Tourism organisation    
At the national level and as part of a general public administration reform, all centrallyorganised tourism bodies were merged in 2007 into a single body, Turismo de Portugal I.P., the National Tourism Authority (NTA) (Figure 4.24).    
Under the aegis of the Secretary of State for Tourism and the Ministry of Economy and Innovation, the NTA is responsible for the promotion, valorisation and sustainability of tourism activities, under a specific umbrella approach, namely: enhancing and developing tourism infrastructure; developing training opportunities; supporting investment in the sector; co-ordinating the promotion of Portugal as a tourism destination – both internally and externally; and regulating and inspecting gambling activities.    
At the regional level, the legislation relating to the responsibilities of Portugal’s tourism regions also underwent revision. Eleven Regional Tourism Bodies (Entidades Regionais de Turismo – ERTs) were created to oversee regional tourism development in the country. These act as management bodies with financial and administrative autonomy and are geographically defined in accordance with the five regional areas that reflect territorial units used for statistical purposes under NUTS 2 (Norte, Centro, Lisboa e Vale do Tejo, Alentejo and Algarve) and with the six tourism development poles (Douro, Serra da Estrela, Leiria-Fátima, Oeste, Litoral Alentejano e Alqueva).    
ERTs are responsible for adding value and promoting the sustainable development of tourism resources, acting as primary communications interfaces with the NTA. Their main responsibilities are to: contribute to national and regional tourism policy; ensure the development and valorisation of tourism products and resources; monitor the tourism product; and promote the regions in the domestic market while co-operating with both the NTA and the seven Regional Agencies for Tourism Development (ARPTs) in the external promotion of regional destinations.    
In the autonomous regions of Madeira and A?ores the Regional Directorates contribute to ensuring the implementation of tourism policy as defined by the autonomous regional governments. Their main responsibilities are to: contribute to regional tourism policy; foster the development of the tourism product; and ensure the co-operation from the regions both with national and international bodies and the NTA.    
The seven ARPTs correspond geographically to the seven promotional destinations in international markets (Porto e Norte, Centro de Portugal, Lisboa Regi?o, Alentejo, Algarve A?ores and Madeira). These are private associations drawn both from the public and private sectors that have a formal protocol (contract) with Turismo de Portugal I.P. Their main responsibilities are to: elaborate and execute the regional tourism promotional plans in accordance with their contract with the NTA; consolidate international promotion; and reinforce the strategic umbrella approach.    

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The NTA has a network of 16 Tourism Promotion Teams abroad, covering 22 international outbound markets. These teams belong to AICEP – Global Portugal Business Development Agency (that in 2004 was the agency responsible for international tourism promotion and still holds a huge network of offices abroad; Turismo de Portugal I.P. has a formal contract with AICEP to use this international network in 22 markets). The tourism teams works at AICEP offices abroad, but are funded by and directly report to Turismo de Portugal I.P. Their main responsibilities are to: develop and implement international tourism actions and marketing campaigns; and enhance operational efficiency.    With this international promotional structure, the Portuguese brand is managed by Turismo de Portugal I.P., and the regional brands by the ARPTs. Domestic promotion and development is co-ordinated with the eleven Regional Tourism Bodies (ERTs).  Figure 4.24. Portugal: Organisational chart of tourism bodiesSource: OECD, adapted from Turismo de Portugal, 2009.IMAGE(https://etravelweek.com/hmattachments/26_201101300519031LGAz.gif)Tourism budgetNTA funding comes from gambling receipts/taxes, not directly from state/government budget, and also from EU structural programmes/frameworks. The total budget for marketing and promotion in 2008 was approximately EUR 50 million, of which EUR 14 million goes directly to Regional Agencies for Tourism Promotion (ARPTs).   Tourism-related policies and programmes    Turismo de Portugal I. P. adopted the government programme SIMPLEX that aims to simplify and eliminate red tape in public administration services, providing an online platform for the classification of accommodation, and a new legal framework for companies engaged in leisure and outdoor activities and water tourism operators.    A variety of programmes exist dealing with the competitiveness of the tourism industry. For example, Turismo de Portugal I.P. has its own network of 17 hospitality and tourism schools, providing training, and certification for students and professionals in the tourism sector.

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This network was re-structured and the curricula were revised in order to prepare young people for their first job and to enable professionals to increase skills, gain certificates and obtain qualifications. A variety of linkages are maintained with institutions such as Florida University, ISCTE (Instituto Superior de Ciências do Trabalho e da Empresa – a public university acting in the domains of education, research and providing community services), Algarve University and ESHT (Escola Superior de Hotelaria e Turismo do Estoril – Estoril Hospitality and Tourism school) and the école H?telière de Lausanne. New hospitality and tourism schools have been opened in Portalegre, Caldas da Rainha and óbidos.    Incentive programmes include QREN – National Strategic Reference Framework (2007-13), providing financial incentives integrated into the Structural Funds and the Cohesion Fund for investment in tourism of a corporate and infrastructure-related nature, Tourism Investment Credit, Bank Protocols (2007-09), dealing with investments of a corporate nature for new products, destinations and tourism development sites, and the PIT – Tourism Intervention Programme (2007-09), dealing with public investment in new products, destinations and tourism development sites provided for in the National Strategic Plan for Tourism, and the promotion of events that contribute towards Portugal’s reputation as a tourism destination (Box 4.31).    Portugal has implemented the Tourism Satellite Account for the reference year 2000 and will now publish TSA data on a regular basis. In addition, the country has developed a new methodology to evaluate the weight of each of the main tourism products in the country’s tourism earnings. Box 4.31. The National Strategic Plan for Tourism – PENTThis is a governmental initiative, under the aegis of the Ministry of Economy and Innovation. Until 2015 it will form the support framework for the sustained growth of tourism and act as an orientation guideline for the National Tourism Authority. PENT defines a stable path of action, involving all parties, with clear targets and objectives, that will enable tourism to provide a decisive contribution to the well-being of the Portuguese population, through wealth generation, job creation, and an inherent capacity to promote territorial cohesion.    PENT’s implementation programme includes the successful execution of the strategic development guidelines, demanding a pro-active approach from both the public and private sectors. Its implementation plan is structured around five action lines: i) territory, destinations and products; ii) brands and markets; iii) enhancing resources; iv) distribution and sales; and v) innovation and knowledge.    These action lines are based on 11 projects which encompass interventions over the entire tourism sector value chain. Strategic development of the tourism sector covers a number of areas, such as outbound markets (a commitment to attracting tourists from 20 international outbound markets and developing domestic tourism), product strategy (consolidating and developing ten strategic tourism products), guidelines for the regions and for tourism development poles, strengthening air access to key tourism destinations, developing a national events calendar, promoting local traditions, improving the urban landscape, and enhancing the quality of service, human resources, promotion, the provision of information and the national tourism brand.Statistical profile

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Table 4.138. Portugal: Domestic overnight tourismSources: INE – National Institute of Statistics, Cross-Border Movements Survey, 2007 and Banco de Portugal.IMAGE(https://etravelweek.com/hmattachments/26_201101300516024ZHvb.gif)Table 4.139. Portugal: Inbound tourism – International arrivals and receipts1. Number of visitors.Sources: INE – National Institute of Statistics, Cross-Border Movements Survey, 2007 and Banco de Portugal.IMAGE(https://etravelweek.com/hmattachments/26_201101300516027dRYk.gif)Table 4.140. Portugal: Outbound Tourism – International departures and expenditure1. Departures, including same-day visitors.Sources: INE – National Institute of Statistics, Cross-Border Movements Survey, 2007.IMAGE(https://etravelweek.com/hmattachments/26_2011013005160266yye.gif)Table 4.141. Portugal: Enterprises in tourismSources: INE – National Institute of Statistics, Hotels and Similar Establishments Survey, Structural Business Survey, 2007.IMAGE(https://etravelweek.com/hmattachments/26_2011013005160214fbI.gif)

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Table 4.142. Portugal: Employment in tourismSources: INE – National Institute of Statistics, Hotels and Similar Establishments Survey, Structural Business Survey, 2007.IMAGE(https://etravelweek.com/hmattachments/26_201101300516022hANG.gif)Table 4.143. Portugal: Tourism in the National Economy – Tourism Satellite Account 2006Sources: Statistics Portugal – The Portuguese Tourism Satellite Account, 2009.IMAGE(https://etravelweek.com/hmattachments/26_201101300516025Xw7I.gif)Table 4.144. Portugal: Other economic indicatorsSources: Statistics Portugal – The Portuguese Tourism Satellite Account, 2009.IMAGE(https://etravelweek.com/hmattachments/26_201101300516023SNr5.gif)

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This network was re-structured and the curricula were revised in order to prepare young people for their first job and to enable professionals to increase skills, gain certificates and obtain qualifications. A variety of linkages are maintained with institutions such as Florida University, ISCTE (Instituto Superior de Ciências do Trabalho e da Empresa – a public university acting in the domains of education, research and providing community services), Algarve University and ESHT (Escola Superior de Hotelaria e Turismo do Estoril – Estoril Hospitality and Tourism school) and the école H?telière de Lausanne. New hospitality and tourism schools have been opened in Portalegre, Caldas da Rainha and óbidos.    Incentive programmes include QREN – National Strategic Reference Framework (2007-13), providing financial incentives integrated into the Structural Funds and the Cohesion Fund for investment in tourism of a corporate and infrastructure-related nature, Tourism Investment Credit, Bank Protocols (2007-09), dealing with investments of a corporate nature for new products, destinations and tourism development sites, and the PIT – Tourism Intervention Programme (2007-09), dealing with public investment in new products, destinations and tourism development sites provided for in the National Strategic Plan for Tourism, and the promotion of events that contribute towards Portugal’s reputation as a tourism destination (Box 4.31).    Portugal has implemented the Tourism Satellite Account for the reference year 2000 and will now publish TSA data on a regular basis. In addition, the country has developed a new methodology to evaluate the weight of each of the main tourism products in the country’s tourism earnings. Box 4.31. The National Strategic Plan for Tourism – PENTThis is a governmental initiative, under the aegis of the Ministry of Economy and Innovation. Until 2015 it will form the support framework for the sustained growth of tourism and act as an orientation guideline for the National Tourism Authority. PENT defines a stable path of action, involving all parties, with clear targets and objectives, that will enable tourism to provide a decisive contribution to the well-being of the Portuguese population, through wealth generation, job creation, and an inherent capacity to promote territorial cohesion.    PENT’s implementation programme includes the successful execution of the strategic development guidelines, demanding a pro-active approach from both the public and private sectors. Its implementation plan is structured around five action lines: i) territory, destinations and products; ii) brands and markets; iii) enhancing resources; iv) distribution and sales; and v) innovation and knowledge.    These action lines are based on 11 projects which encompass interventions over the entire tourism sector value chain. Strategic development of the tourism sector covers a number of areas, such as outbound markets (a commitment to attracting tourists from 20 international outbound markets and developing domestic tourism), product strategy (consolidating and developing ten strategic tourism products), guidelines for the regions and for tourism development poles, strengthening air access to key tourism destinations, developing a national events calendar, promoting local traditions, improving the urban landscape, and enhancing the quality of service, human resources, promotion, the provision of information and the national tourism brand.Statistical profile

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Table 4.142. Portugal: Employment in tourismSources: INE – National Institute of Statistics, Hotels and Similar Establishments Survey, Structural Business Survey, 2007.IMAGE(https://etravelweek.com/hmattachments/26_201101300516022hANG.gif)Table 4.143. Portugal: Tourism in the National Economy – Tourism Satellite Account 2006Sources: Statistics Portugal – The Portuguese Tourism Satellite Account, 2009.IMAGE(https://etravelweek.com/hmattachments/26_201101300516025Xw7I.gif)Table 4.144. Portugal: Other economic indicatorsSources: Statistics Portugal – The Portuguese Tourism Satellite Account, 2009.IMAGE(https://etravelweek.com/hmattachments/26_201101300516023SNr5.gif)

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